When I was asked to be a contributing writer for www.QuadCities.com and create articles about art, I was elated and overwhelmed with the possibilities of topics. Art is such a broad and beautiful beast of tradition, progressiveness, creative conundrums and evolving expression.

Would I talk about the benefits of art? That in itself is a novel of information when sharing the emotional, developmental, social, educational, and holistic and economic benefits. Or would I address all the art happenings that are currently and in the future about to be presented in the Quad Cities?

Perhaps I would interview various artists of many artistic mediums? Should I mention the importance of art in community building, creative placemaking and tourism or talk solely about the art being created and exhibited right now in the Quads? My mind was a blaze with questions, thoughts, internal dialogue and potential interview questions.

And then I stopped to breathe. Inhale, exhale. I looked slowly around my living room as I systematically breathed deeply and slowly and observed the well-chosen artworks I hung carefully, complimented by sculptures, antiques, living art as a plethora of plants in vintage containers and listened to my favorite classical music. I was surrounded by art and creative decorating that reflected my tastes, my preferences, my favorite colors, textures and design, and this was my creative sanctuary I called home. This is where life happened, memories were made, art sales were executed, stimulating conversations were made and echoes of expression of my heart lingered. Once again, I was reminded that art from life and life from art are one in the same.
Art has always been a part of my life. It wasn’t until I was a young adult that I realized that not all individuals had the privilege of growing up in a creative home, exposed to artistic opportunities, and fewer less were raised by an internationally recognized artist. How could my bias outlet and experience be best communicated to the general public?

I had already initiated the presentation of a radio show entitled “Nurturing Your Creative Spirit” online for a year. I had the freedom of an hour broadcast to speak on anything my heart desired in regards to creativity and art. It was liberating and offered me to speak on various topics, interview people from around the world, share personal stories and provide many educational resources and information. Material to write was not my concern, but rather my approach.

The wonderful thing about art, is that it is broad. It is universal. It is diversified. It is, to me, magical. Whether images portraying the past, the present, the future, dreams, fears, people, places or other things, emphasis on color, texture, line, form, brushstrokes, specific approaches common or rare, or the simplicity of the Universal Drawing techniques, art has subjective and objective opinions, provokes varies responses and serves many different intentions and purposes.

To make art, to understand art, to enjoy art and to engage with art, one must be willing to explore, discover, and observe, express and much more! This takes action. This takes living. Most of art is derived from life experiences. Many would claim their life is enhance, improved, and more fulfilling with art in it. Hence, my view that Art from Life and Life from Art is truth.

Another question I asked myself about writing this column, was, would I share quotes? Which famous quotes would I choose? Would I dare to share my own quotes? After serving the Quad Cities for twenty five years as an artist, arts educator, arts activist, arts promoter – basically an Arts Ambassador, I have decided that I would not limit myself and let the creative and organic art of living inspire the words to flow and perhaps, address every question I asked myself. My passion for art will guide me. My passion for living creatively and sharing the growth and fulfillment derived from it to inspire others will in effect, become a beautiful masterpiece of weaving more value for art locally and hopefully globally. As people begin to learn and consider the value, the benefits, intimate details of artisans themselves, experience exhibits and embrace life in general, the art of living and the art created in our lifetime will be a masterpiece within itself. Your life is masterpiece. It is my honor that perhaps you would allow me to leave a brushstroke or too of wisdom, information and resources to your canvas.

Until my next article, I want you to embrace your innate child, as children are born innately creative, and prepare yourself as a creative spirit on an artistic journey to personal growth.

Breathe. Release the inner critic. Your creativity cannot take hold in an environment of criticizing. Tame your inner critic by replacing judging with curiosity and self-respect. Breathe. Take a risk. Our most important inventions and social movements came from someone who was willing to take a risk and be different. Breathe. Execute SOMETHING. Creative people who are good at executing experience success. Don’t let good ideas be wasted and don’t procrastinate. Breathe. Think of alternatives. Creative people generate alternatives and are great at brainstorming. Embrace challenges and problem solving. Breathe. Make time. Devote regular time to develop your creativity doing something on your own and uninhibited and outside your comfort zone. Breathe. What is your energy vibe? Creative people listen to their natural body rhythms. They surround themselves in environments that facilitate their creativity and spark energy. Do that. Bring your creative spirit to life in your life.

I look forward to this journey with you. If you have any suggestions or comments in regard to this column, please feel free to contact me at ecoartscouncilqc@aol.com.

Until next time, nurture your creative spirit!

Glorie Iaccarino is a Quad City native and Ambassador for the Arts. Her passion for creativity, advocacy and community is evident in the service she has provided over the last twenty five years in the QCA. Glorie has worked tirelessly for the cause and benefits of art and its integration with community building. Glorie has received local and international recognition for her life's work.